Our Philosophy

Reason. First and foremost, we believe in proven facts and rationale, and place strong emphasis on clarity and argument which is usually achieved through formal logic and analytical mind with respect of empirical sciences – natural, social, behavioral, cognitive and any one of their associated branches. We love reading medical science journals, scientific research studies and think that PubMed is the coolest website online. Impartiality and unbiased evaluations is our goal.

“Science is facts; just as houses are made of stone, so is science made of facts; but a pile of stones is not a house, and a collection of facts is not necessarily science.” – Jules Henri Poincaré

Respect. There is no “it” when referring to dogs. A dog is either a “he” or a “she.” And even though we are all dog owners for the sake of promoting responsible and caring pet ownership with the use of reason, canines still remain our loyal companions, not slaves. Dog fighting is a despicable practice as is any other kind of animal cruelty and animal abuse (including usage of all high-tech equipments like shock collars). We support dog adoption from shelters over pet stores, and have no issues with responsible breeders.

“Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.” – Roger Caras

Friendship. Even though here at NGD we’re pushing our own agenda of educating dog owners using scientific evidence as proof, we do hope to develop warm friendship with our readers and contribute to the growing community of caring and responsible dog ownership. We sincerely love every single one of you who understand the importance of accurate information in order to keep our dogs healthy and happy, and who have warm hearts to deeply care for these animals.

“One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood.” – Lucius Annaeus Seneca


How to read medical studies

We provide a lot of study citations and research material on this site, therefore, we believe that it’s important for you to know how we evaluate such material, and also for you to learn how to critically assess it in order to draw the most accurate conclusions. Consider the following:

  1. Length of the study: long-term over short-term
  2. Types: more emphasis on controlled, double-blind comparative, randomized
  3. Group types, settings and similar factors that impact the study
  4. Humans vs. animals, vitro vs. vivo
  5. Support of citations for the claims made in the study
  6. Correlation vs. causation
  7. Authors of the study, their previous work, methods
  8. Relative risk vs. absolute risk
  9. Conclusion vs. review of the study
  10. Use of logical sense, and comparison to other papers, authors

Here are some in-depth articles on how you can read medical research studies in general:

  • http://www.bmj.com/about-bmj/resources-readers/publications/how-read-paper
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/30/health/30stud.html?pagewanted=all
  • https://academic.cuesta.edu/acasupp/AS/620.htm